Rehydrating Dried Sourdough Starter (easy 24-hour guide)

Many guides on rehydrating dried sourdough starter include an unnecessary amount of feedings. That’s why I created this easy 24-hour guide to help others skip the excess and hydrate a starter the easy way. In this post, you’ll find my step-by-step instructions to guide you.

jar of starter open

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Step-By-Step Guide for Rehydrating Sourdough Starter

instructions for rehydration of a starter
Source: Plum Branch Home
steps to rehydrate the starter
Source: Plum Branch Home

Why My Instructions Are Different Than Others

  • Eliminated unnecessary steps in the rehydration process.
  • I made the instructions simple and easy to follow.
  • Instead of making the process take 3–4 days, I made it short and simple.
  • There are no unnecessary extra feedings before it’s ready to be used.

Rehydrating Dried Sourdough Starter FAQ

How long does dried sourdough starter last?

Dried sourdough starter will last indefinitely in a cool, dry place like your pantry or a cabinet. It will not go bad.

My starter is not bubbling after I did this and did not grow, what is happening?

A few things could be happening. If your house is colder than 68–70 degrees, it could take a little longer for the cultures to become active. Also, if your starter wasn’t fed 4–12 hours before drying it, it could be a little weak and need a few more feedings to get bubbly and active. 

What flour should I use to rehydrate my starter?

Use the same type of flour that was used to create and/or maintain the starter before drying. For example, if you used all-purpose flour before, use it to rehydrate your dried starter.

Check out my guide on the best flour for feeding a sourdough starter. It will answer all your questions!

Why can’t I just pour water in to rehydrate my starter?

When you rehydrate your dried starter, you want to revive it in a way that feeds the cultures. If you just used water, sure, it would get it hydrated, but it wouldn’t feed it at the same time. This would cause a weak starter that would take much longer to bring back to its active state. 

More Helpful Sourdough Education Guides

Full Printable Instructions

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Rehydrating Dried Sourdough Starter

Many guides on rehydrating dried sourdough starter include an unnecessary amount of feedings. That's why I created this easy 24-hour guide to help others skip the excess and hydrate a starter the easy way. In this post, you'll find my step-by-step instructions to guide you.
Prep Time5 minutes
Rehydrating1 day
Total Time1 day 5 minutes
Yield: 0.5 cup dried starter
Author: Molly LaFontaine of Plum Branch Home

Instructions

Find a Container

  • Find a glass container that’s around 32 ounces in size minimum. You can go larger if you’d like.
  • (read my Choosing a Sourdough Starter guide on the blog in the sourdough explained section)

Do the Transfer

  • Once you’ve chosen a container, ensure it’s clean then pour your dehydrated starter into it.

Gather Supplies

  • Before we begin hydrating, gather these items:
  • unbleached all-purpose flour
  • filtered water from your fridge, a pitcher, or home system. Not straight from the unfiltered sink.

Rehydrate

  • To rehydrate your 1/2 cup of sourdough starter and help it grow, feed it a 1:1 ratio of flour to water.
  • pour 1/2 cup flour into the jar, then add 1/2 cup water, and stir to completely combine.
  • scrape down the sides and cover lightly, never with an air-tight lid. Leave it loose.
  • Let it sit on the counter for 12 hours.

Feed Starter

  • Now that your starter is rehydrated, it’s time to do a feeding. Do the same thing as step 4 but this time feed it a 2:1 ratio of flour to water.
  • That means 1 cup flour + 1/2 cup water. Stir to combine. You can either leave it on the counter to ferment for 12 hours then use it for a recipe or place it in the fridge.

Maintenance

  • Now that your starter is rehydrated you’re ready to make goodies and breads! It needs to be maintained from now on. Here’s how you’ll do that:
  • feed the 2:1 ratio of flour to water every 12 hours if stored on the countertop or once a week if stored in the fridge.

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